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Archive for the ‘Plant stuff’ Category

I know there are numerous and interesting timelapse art creations all over the internet, but this one is absolutely wonderful. I recommand you follow the link and experience this one:

Flower.

Nothing to add!

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January Berry Go Round #66 is posted! Go read your plant carnival now!

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Gogonuts palm edition, perhaps oddy a psalm oddly…

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Berry Go Round #64

Previous Berry Go Round is found at For the love of plants.

This is edition #64.

Unfortunately, I’m currently only left handed, so this edition will be more like a round of links and probably less wordy than could have been.

Any typo is mine…

Are tannin familiar to you? Did you know about how there’s even a special organella devoted to them? Then you should learn about it thanks to Kathleen Raven at Food Matters:

This is a wonderfull collaborative blog, so you may find a lot of other stuff of interest, with or without plants but plenty:

And even GMOs debate going on:

Anyhow, please have a nice blog mining, and hopefully we’ll meet Food Matters on next occasion!

Season is falling in tempirate climate, so how do trees cope? Find out in good company at… a rocking plant I thing:

Unless you’d prefer Ghosts in the Rocks and spectacular spectralities!

  • Needles to say, sheathe got an option! Looking closer is always good…

If it’s edible… it’s also readable:

Or passing by, can you take it warm?

Some more Raflesia on the internets: How A Plant Makes The Biggest Flower of Them All

Aren’t plants always a mass of stuff? Well, while some families are familiar, the other are… Malpighiales: A Glorious Mess of Flowering Plants

Mossible? Unmossible?

Climate change is happening (one more bit of evidence):

Okay! Left hand tired flat! Oh, but there are many more gems over over!

For example, what’s in a tropical understory? A sub story of some sort? Probably not:

And browse the recent tropical blogging at Phytofactor!

Wants more? Well, next Berry is expected soon! Please volunteer if you feel like, you’re welcome to too!

Late edit: forgot this submission, about Larchness monster.

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Oops, I’m late. Please find September’s edition of Berry Go Round.

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Keep up with BGR!

The latest Berry Go Round can be found at Mostly Science. Go read!

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Lianas are so good for mandalas!

Simple horizon

And here’s another take: (more…)

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I was just reading the following post on The Panda’s ThumbChallenge: research in the 1000 most common words. Basically, it is pointing to a list of the 1000 most common words in the English language and challenging you to write a simple statement of your research that is only using words from this list.

There’s this link that will check it for you when typing.

That’s really challenging. I lost at this game. This has a lot to do with the fact that I’m currently working in a discipline that cannot avoid a minimal jargon: phytopathology, the science of plant pests and plant illness. Any word related to pests (pathogens, fungi, microbes, viruses) are forbidden first. And it all begun with “plant” itself, which is not allowed (plants do not belong the 1000 commonest, does it make sense?). I’m afraid there’s no way I can express my research under such a challenging constraint. The best I came up with was this:

I study how small cell things are attacking bigger green things that need light and water to grow.

And frankly, this is just a way to weave in implicit meaning. That is, I’m utterly wrong. Anybody ignoring or not getting the implicit that green things that need light and water to grow means plant won’t have the slightest idea as to what I’m doing in my job. Not to say “small cell things” is any better -it is much worse indeed. It’s a very bad way to imply I’m working on fungi, the only idea I get somewhat right is that they are plant enemies.

I think I need to ponder about simpler ways to tell what I’m doing in my job…

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Just played again with a random poetry generator. Made it for ferns. Made my moment.

First try is not bad:

Sporophytic Food

Horticulture bugs with actual fossile record.
Shall not a taxonomist radiate with Carboniferous phenotypes?
Direct sunlight is used as the ferns of plenty of families,
But the study of ferns ponders many taxa.

Growing garden!
Hark!
The fern radiation allows for the sister species’ spores.
Forget it!

or even this second one:

The Study Of Ferns’ Fossile Record

Direct sunlight has the fern radiation’s importance,
But It reduces the wind’s phenotype.
Wet conditions begins with actual garden.
Oh, no!

Classification disperses the food of Fern’s spores.
Alas!
The sister species is called growing period.
Ah, but a taxonomist ponders cheap taxa!

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Timelapse of fern sprouting. Saturday like.

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