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Archive for the ‘Factory’ Category

Frequence

Click on the picture to go and see. Don’t stay too long though! :)

xkcd & frequencies

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Leaking News Factory

This week in ecologies & evolutions:

  • Free living (not viling) eucaryotes species can last a long time (over a decade!) under hard drought conditions, without being specifically adapted to dryness or flood (when it happens). Calls for inherent resilience of [Australian] semi-arid floodplain soil communities under increasing pressure from climatic induced changes in water availability. Soils probably suit for enduring changes, which is good news.
    Baldwin D S, Colloff M J, Rees G N, Chariton A A, Watson G O, Court L N, Hartley D M, Morgan M j, King A J, Wilson J S, Hodda M, Hardy C M (2013). Impacts of inundation and drought on eukaryote biodiversity in semi-arid floodplain soils. Molecular Ecology 1365-294X DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.12190
  • Traditional experiments on pathogen growth curves relied on air temperature. This study suggests we better use leaf temperature instead. Certainly will lead to arrays of follow ups…
    Bernard F, Sache I, Suffert F, Chelle M (2013). The development of a foliar fungal pathogen does react to leaf temperature! New Phytologist 1469-8137

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nph.12134

  • This wins the funny title, as it may be misleading by jargonry. The “ecosystem engineer” plays a key role in food webs, being a common foodstuff for a number of marine birds including the oystercatcher. Hope you didn’t want to apply for the job. Climate change will alter ecosystem functionning, and has begun to impact the spawning period in the cockle, which extended over a greater number of months compared with previous studies.
    Morgan E, O’ Riordan R M, Culloty S C (2013). Climate change impacts on potential recruitment in an ecosystem engineer. Ecology and Evolution 2045-7758 http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.419

And that’s it for this week.

 

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Here we are:

  • Old rural parks support higher biodiversity than forest remnants. That is, because they are at least much higher with large-diameter dead wood types, which increases diversity mediated by big wood chunks.

    K Lõhmus & J Liira (2013). Old rural parks support higher biodiversity than forest remnants. Basic and Applied Ecology   http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.baae.2012.12.009

  • The Technological favourite: Functional genomics of a generalist parasitic plant: Laser microdissection of host-parasite interface reveals host-specific patterns of parasite gene expression. Certainly a prowess, spotting gene expression patterns at a very very local scale (cells). And the model plant parasite modulates expression depending on host encountered… Wow!

    LA Honaas, EK Wafula, Z Yang, JP Der, NJ Wickett, NS Altman, CG Taylor, JI Yoder, MP Timko, JH Westwood & CW dePamphilis (2013) Functional genomics of a generalist parasitic plant: Laser microdissection of host-parasite interface reveals host-specific patterns of parasite gene expression. BMC Plant Biology 2013, 13:9 doi:10.1186/1471-2229-13-9 (open access!)

  • Title says it all: Tropics accelerate the evolution of hybrid males sterility in Drosophila. If this finding can be generalized a bit, then it lays out a process to tropics species higher diversity.

    R Yukilevich (2013). Tropics accelerate the evolution of hybrid males sterility in Drosophila. Evolution   DOI: 10.1111/evo.12056

  • A dating success story: genomes and fossils converge on placental mammal origins. Good news, sometimes hard stones evidence and molecular clocks agree at finer scale!

    A Goswami (2013). A dating success story: genomes and fossils converge on placental mammal origins. EvoDevo DOI: 10.1186/2041-9139-3-18 %T (open access!)

  • Title price: funny edition: The elephant in the room: the role of failed invasions in understanding invasion biology. That is for conclusion marketting! And indeed, there’s room to reflect upon failed invasions, because many studies of invasives try to correlate success with characteristics (we aim to predictability of invasions!).

    RD Zenni & MA Nuñez (2013). The elephant in the room: the role of failed invasions in understanding invasion biology. OIKOS DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0706.2012.00254.x

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